Ep26 -Jim Karrh CEO of Karrh & Associates

Ep26 -Jim Karrh CEO of Karrh & Associates

Show Notes

Jim Karrh of Karrh & Associates on why he listens to High Level Wisdom  [02:14]

Jim’s career trajectory: From being a teenage DJ at a country radio station to managing his own consultancy business  [03:21]

“Sometimes it’s actually easier if you’re the small guy in an industry to compete against the big guys because you can move faster; you don’t get bogged down by bureaucracy and the like.”  [08:20]

An important turning point in Jim’s career happened during his son’s soccer practice.  [09:42]

Jim works with executives who are trying to recruit, train and motivate people.  [11:31]

On the surface-level and deeper-level influence millennials have on the workplace  [14:03]

Jim talks about the impact of truly understanding your job: “What I find is oftentimes we’re trying to equip people with a sense of how to talk about the business and understand the business and saying it to the outside world. And what happens is there’s a better sense inside as well.”  [15:39]

Communication gap: Synchronous communication style of baby boomers vs. the asynchronous style of millennials  [17:50]

The dangers of not being able to communicate your message effectively  [20:38]

What is the “Great Shift Change” (or the “Great Crew Change”) and what are its implications?  [24:00]

How executives are preparing for the Great Shift Change  [25:38]

Why are manufacturing companies struggling to gain talent?  [26:07]

Jim talks about General Electric’s TV ad series “What’s the Matter with Owen?”  [27:13]

Jim’s insight on manufacturing jobs: “I think that there is a perception problem in terms of what those jobs are like, what the future is, what they pay, and your ability to bring creativity. … There’s probably an old perception about an assembly line — that also does not apply, that is not reality.”  [27:54]

Why I love BestBuy and have a strong connection to it  [33:19]

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Quotes

Millennials are less likely to want to have a job for the sake of that they’re supposed to have a job. They like to think that there is a direct connection to a greater social and community good. — Jim Karrh

What I find is oftentimes we’re trying to equip people with a sense of how to talk about the business and understand the business and saying it to the outside world. And what happens is there’s a better sense inside as well. — Jim Karrh

If you can’t appeal to and attract and retain that right group of younger workers, you can’t grow. — Jim Karrh

We’ll very soon be in a point in most industries where the majority of their prospective customer base are millennials. So if you can’t figure out how to communicate your value to that group, then you can’t grow. — Jim Karrh

There are simple steps that you can make, as that younger worker, to find opportunities: Make yourself visible, ask good questions, and make yourself seen as more and more valuable. — Jim Karrh

There are steps that the executive leadership can take to help convey their value, to help tell their story in a way that’s still comfortable to them. — Jim Karrh

 

Links and Mentions

Jim Karrh’s website

Duke MBA

University of Florida

Nestle

Coca Cola

PepsiCo

DSG Consulting

Fortune 500

Florida Gators

General Electric

Article: The Alarming Economic Trend Behind GE’s Odd Ad Campaign

Opower

Tim Cook

Jeff Bezos

Amazon.com

Microsoft

Best Buy

CompUSA

Apple Inc.

High Level Wisdom blog

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