Why did you leave your last job?

Why did you leave your last job?

It’s the biggest complaint and stereotype of #Millennials, that we are only “committed” for a short time to any company then leave for greener grass quickly. While many older Millennials (25-35) may dispute this claim with tighter job markets and inability to see a career path, is there something to this arguement?
Instead of quoting figures to you throughout article, let’s just examine the behavior of leaving a job in the first place. As a Millennial, think about the last time to left a job, what was the reason? What motivated you? And we’re those motivations realized in the next role or did you end up back in the same place with this new job? Irritated with something you don’t like and “needing a change”…again.
I’m sure there are plenty of valid reasons to search for “better” employment elsewhere. But the truth is perception is reality and when your longest held position is 1 year and you’ve been in 5 roles in the last 7 years, it screams UNCOMMITTED to recruiters and those with power to hire. This also hurts the value of your skill set, even though you know you could do the job in your sleep. So maybe we should talk about why we have chosen to switch jobs so quickly.
We have all heard the saying “If you don’t like your job, quit”. Some companies operate with this mantra because of arrogance. But as a job seeker, we tend to use this as an out to finding a better job. Sometimes, the best advice is not the best advice to take at that time. When things get hard, and they do, we look for ways to justify leaving or becoming very rebellious toward the work or our manager. When the demand picks up of your time, or the deadlines seems to be always “right now”, it’s our opportunity to learn more about ourselves and the internal triggers we need to overcome. Here are some tips to not jump ship so quickly;
– Learn the your emotions are indicators, not dictators. Just because you feel stress about the demands or the job doesn’t mean it’s the job or the manager. It could mean that you have not had enough practice being in stressful situations to know how to handle you in the moment.
– Get clear on what is actually stressful about the situation. Many times we will find that the stress is self-indusing. Meaning sometimes as Millennials, we make things bigger than they actually are. The other side to this is we may be stressed because we don’t feel confident to execute whatever the task is that we are given. So we “Act out” of ignorance. In those moments, drop your pride and admit you don’t know and ask for help. More people are willing to help than you can see in a stressful situational moment.
– Get used to it. A new job doesn’t mean you will never have stress, tight deadlines or a tough boss. Life is stressful. Learn how to find healthy ways to cope with it. Running, biking, talking with friends, reading a book, video games…you get the point. Find what works for you that’s not damaging to you or those around you. Overtime and the more you grow in the company, you will learn to live in the uncomfortable space of stress and still succeed.
Now, if you still choose to jump ship, don’t be surprised if those same feelings are waiting for you in the new place. And that might not be a bad thing. It’s a good sign that it’s not the job, it’s just you and now is the time for you to manage your emotions so you can be more productive for you and the company.

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